The Constitution

Solar eclipse wows Parkview students

A+total+eclipse+of+the+sun+occurred+on+August+21%2C+and+cut+a+path+across+the+country%2C+but+fell+in+neighboring+states+instead+of+Arkansas.+Arkansas+saw+90+percent+of+the+total+eclipse.+This+photo+was+taken+at+the+height+of+the+eclipise+in+central+Arkansas.
A total eclipse of the sun occurred on August 21, and cut a path across the country, but fell in neighboring states instead of Arkansas. Arkansas saw 90 percent of the total eclipse. This photo was taken at the height of the eclipise in central Arkansas.

A total eclipse of the sun occurred on August 21, and cut a path across the country, but fell in neighboring states instead of Arkansas. Arkansas saw 90 percent of the total eclipse. This photo was taken at the height of the eclipise in central Arkansas.

A total eclipse of the sun occurred on August 21, and cut a path across the country, but fell in neighboring states instead of Arkansas. Arkansas saw 90 percent of the total eclipse. This photo was taken at the height of the eclipise in central Arkansas.

By Kelton Farsee, Constitution Newspaper Staff

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






On August 21 schools in Little Rock were scheduled to see the solar eclipse with special glasses. However, the viewing  had to be canceled because of the recall on the glasses. The district found out that the company that sold them the glasses could not certify them for safety. School occurred as usual, and teachers were encouraged work the event into their lessons where possible.

In other districts, fears that children might permanently damage their eyes viewing the eclipse caused schools to cancel classes for the day.  

Despite the last minute cancellation with the solar glasses, many students still found a way to see the eclipse.

Shelby Ellison, sophomore, said she saw the eclipse with glasses that her friend brought to her. “I remember going outside right before it started. When I went out it was  a lot cooler. Before the eclipes I could see the crescent [of the sun peeking out behind the moon] As the eclipse took place, the crescent got bigger. There was a group of people outside and everyone traded glasses. Some people were putting the glasses through the lens on thier phone so they could put it on snapchat. I do think they should have gotten everyone glasses. I don’t think we should have stayed home…the next eclipse is in seven years.”

The next eclipse will be April 8, 2024. During that eclipse, the path of totality will sweep right through central Arkansas.

Other students were denied their moment in the moon’s bath.

Josh Hernandez, junior, said he saw the eclipse with coach Vincent. “I remember going outside right before it started. When I went out it was a lot cooler. It became to be a lot darker. My classmates started to get a little more rowdy. The day seemed to be a lot shorter to. No I dont think we should have stayed at home because you will eventually have a chance to see it later on.

Other students used the attendance office to assure they would have the time out of class to see the event.

“We went out to the fieldhouse and got some lawn chairs. It got a lot darker and the temperature dropped, and we sat out there and watched the whole thing. The disappointing thing was if you didn’t get the glasses and you didn’t know about it, you wouldn’t get to see it,” Tyler De Vries, sophomore, who said his brief vacation was made possible by his mother, who checked him out through the front office.

In Scottsdale, Ariz., the school district told parents that schools would have no outdoor activities between 9 a.m. and noon , while the eclipse took place. In Nashville, Tennessee’s public schools, one of the largest districts in the eclipse path, the school initially planned to have classes. However, at the mayor’s urging, the school district reversed its course, and closed schools for the day citing challenges with traffic and transportation after the area received multiple visitors and press attention because it was in the path of totality. 

 Once every 18 months on average, a total solar eclipse is visible from some place on the earth’s surface. That’s two totalities for every three years.  On the average, the length of the moon’s shadow at the new moon phase  is 232,100 miles, and the moon’s distance to the earth’s surface is, on average, 234,900 miles, according to information from NASA.gov. This means when the moon passes directly in front of the sun,  sky watchers will witness what’s known as an annular eclipse, with a dazzling ring of sunlight still visible around the moon’s silhouette. 

 

       

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




The Student News Site of Parkview Arts/Science Magnet High School
Solar eclipse wows Parkview students